A Word From Dr. Stewart: Could Oral Bacteria Be Linked to an Increased Risk of Pancreatic Cancer?

Posted on October 3, 2012. Filed under: Dental Health, Dental Hygiene Tips, Dental Hygienist, Dental Treatment, gum disease, Gum Surgery, LANAP, Oral Health, Oral Health and Nutrition, pancreatic cancer, Periodontal Disease, Smile Savers Dentistry | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Dr. Daniel Stewart at Smile Savers Dentistry in Columbia MarylandThe British Dental Health Foundation published a report yesterday that gum disease and pancreatic cancer may be associated with one another. The study found that certain types of bacterium in gum disease are linked to a 2 times higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer. However, this is not to be confused with oral bacteria that is not harmful. If you have been told that you have periodontal disease, please don’t wait for it to further affect your health and well-being. Smile Savers Dentistry offers an excellent, proven alternative to gum surgery… more on that in a minute.

Researchers are saying that while they can’t yet prove that gum disease increases the risk of pancreatic cancer, the new research shows there is definitely evidence that there is a significant relationship between the two. It is not certain if certain bacteria found in gum disease is a cause or a result of pancreatic cancer. Breaking this down to the simplest point … this is yet another indication that good oral hygiene is crucial to one’s overall health. Did you know that only 4% of pancreatic cancer patients live for more than 5 years?

If you have been diagnosed with gum disease or feel you should be evaluated, call our Columbia dental office immediately for an appointment at 410-730-6460. Smile Savers Dentistry offers LANAP which is an FDA approved laser alternative to gum surgery. This laser-based approach to treating gum disease makes it easier for you to return your gums to health and the process is far more comfortable than gum surgery. You can visit our LANAP website for more information on this non-surgical treatment for periodontal disease.

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