The Relationship Between Sugar And Your Oral Health

Posted on October 13, 2016. Filed under: Dental Care, Dental Cavity, Dental Hygiene Tips, Oral Health, Oral Health and Nutrition | Tags: , , , , |

pumpkin-cookieFall is in the air and it seems you can’t go anywhere without pumpkin-flavored something or other staring you in the face. And around the corner is Halloween, the unofficial kickoff for celebrating all things sweet and sugary. 

Most people think that sugars in their food and drink are what play a major role in the development of tooth decay. But it’s not the sugar itself that does the damage. Certain bacteria feed on the sugars, use it as energy and then release acid, which gradually dissolves tooth enamel. The acid produced by plaque can eventually create a small hole in the enamel. Left untreated, dental cavities can eventually progress into the deeper layers of the tooth to the nerve, causing pain and possible tooth loss.

Dental caries (tooth decay) are the most common cause of tooth loss in young people. While everyone is at risk of tooth decay, children and teens are most at risk. 

One needs to stay on their toes to avoid the negative effects of sugar on teeth. The first step is to pay attention to the amount of time your teeth are exposed to sugar. Eating a cookie is much better for your teeth than drinking a soda or fruit juice, as it is a shorter exposure to the sugar.

• Brush and floss twice a day.
• Avoid snacking on sticky-sugary items (ex: gummy bears, fruit chews)
• Reduce your consumption of sugary drinks.
• Limit sugary foods to mealtimes.
• Rinse with water after eating sugary foods.
• Maintain regular dental check-ups and cleanings.

Add regular dental visits to the mix, and you and your loved ones have the best shot at winning the battle against tooth decay.

Call the Smile Savers Dentistry office in Columbia, MD today to schedule your dental hygiene appointment at 410-730-6460. We want you to keep your teeth healthy for your lifetime. We’re currently accepting new and emergency dental patients in the Howard County area.

Sources:
http://www.actiononsugar.org/Sugar%20and%20Health/Sugar%20and%20dental%20caries/151885.html
http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/cavities/article/what-are-the-effects-of-sugar-on-teeth-1214
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-surprising-relationship-between-sugar-and-tooth-decay-232927761.html

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